How to check knitting gauge in the round

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It’s time to start a sweater (we’re making Ursa on our latest knit-along) and you know you want to check your gauge but the sweater is knit in the round. Since we won’t be turning our work and we’ll only be knitting this gauge might be a little different than normal.

As a knitter, I know that my tension is different when I purl than when I knit and since this project will be worked mostly in the round and I won’t be purling much I’d like to make sure I’m getting the stitch count the designer recommends.

I’ve put together some photos on how to knit and block a gauge swatch in the round.

How to Check Knitting Gauge in the Round

Yarn and needles for a gauge swatch

Yarn and needles for a gauge swatch

Step 1: Cast on

Step 1: Cast on

When knitting any swatch you want to start with the exact yarn the project will be made in and the same needles you plan to knit the sweater with. Variations on either of these items can result in a different gauge.

For the sweater I’m knitting I need a gauge of 11.5 stitches over 4 inches. I will have 20 stitches on size US 11 (8 mm) needles for this swatch.

Cast on normally. DO NOT TURN.

Slide stitches to the other end of the needle

Slide stitches to the other end of the needle

Hold working yarn to the back creating a long float

Hold working yarn to the back creating a long float

Now for the strange part! SLIDE your stitches to the other end of the needle so the front of the work is still facing you.

Hold the working yarn from the ball across the back of your hand and knit into the first stitch. Continue knitting across the row. This will create a long, loose float of yarn across the back of your work.

DO NOT TURN. Slide work back to the other end of the needle always keeping the knit side facing you.

Knitting a gauge swatch in the round

Knitting a gauge swatch in the round

Knitting a gauge swatch in the round

Knitting a gauge swatch in the round

After a few rows this is what the piece will start to look like. You can see the knit side of the work on the left and the wrong side or purl side in the right photo.

Knitting a gauge swatch in the round

Knitting a gauge swatch in the round

How to trim a gauge swatch knit in the round

How to trim a gauge swatch knit in the round

When the swatch reaches a good height bind off as normal.

Flip the swatch to the wrong side and (YIKES!) cut the floats so the swatch opens flat.

Knitting a gauge swatch in the round

Knitting a gauge swatch in the round

Blocking a gauge swatch for knitting in the round

Blocking a gauge swatch for knitting in the round

Here’s my swatch. It looks crazy, doesn’t it?! All of those edges seem like they could just fall off but they don’t. Just be gentle.

Next we need to block the swatch. In a small bowl I added a touch of Soak wash and cool water. Submerge the swatch and leave to rest for 15-30 minutes.

Blocking a gauge swatch for knitting in the round

Blocking a gauge swatch for knitting in the round

Blocking a gauge swatch for knitting in the round

Blocking a gauge swatch for knitting in the round

Remove the swatch from the bath and gently lay it out on a towel.

Blocking a gauge swatch for knitting in the round

Blocking a gauge swatch for knitting in the round

Blocking a gauge swatch for knitting in the round

Blocking a gauge swatch for knitting in the round

Fold the towel over the swatch and lightly roll the towel pressing the water from the yarn.

On a dry towel straighten the swatch, leave it to rest and dry completely.

I block my knit swatch just like I plan to block the finished sweater. I don’t pin a swatch if I don’t plan to pin the sweater.

How to measure knitting gauge in the round

How to measure knitting gauge in the round

When the swatch is dry it’s time to measure the stitches. Exciting stuff for a knitter!

I like to use a stiff ruler and gently lay it across a row to count the stitches. I also measure in several locations around the swatch to be sure that one row wasn’t a fluke.

How to measure knitting gauge in the round

How to measure knitting gauge in the round

And here we are! Count the Vs of each knit stitch as one stitch. My swatch is measuring 11.5 stitches across 4 inches just like the pattern asked for.


I hope you’ll join me for the Ursa sweater knit-along starting on Thursday, August 1, 2019! Here’s the details:

  1. Thursday, August 1: KAL kickoff and cast-on with details about knitting the half-brioche stitch, neck and shoulders of the sweater.

  2. Thursday, August 8: Working the German short row bust darts and finishing the body of the sweater.

  3. Thursday, August 15: Knitting the sleeves, finishing the neckline and blocking.

  4. Thursday, August 22: Wrap photos!

Get your yarn: Find the yarn at a local yarn shop that carries Ewe Ewe Yarns or here on our website.

Let us know you’re joining the KAL! Leave a comment on this post, join our Facebook KAL group, Ravelry group, and use hashtags any photos with #eweeweyarns and #BaaBaaUrsa on Instagram.


Fun + Festive: Winter Wonderland Mini Garland

Winter Wonderland Mini Garland limited edition kit by PostStitch

Winter Wonderland Mini Garland limited edition kit by PostStitch

Add some festiveness to you your winter months with the new Winter Wonderland Mini Garland knitting kits by PostStitch. This limited edition kit includes everything you need to create adorable garland to hang in your home!

The Winter Wonderland Mini Garland knitting kit includes 4 balls of Ewe Ewe Fluffy Fingering merino yarn, a pattern with 2 mini mittens, 2 mini hats, 2 mini stockings plus twine, tiny pom poms, clothespins and jingle bells so you can mix and match to create your own wintery look. Awesome!

Ideas to use this garland:

Make 24 minis and use them as an advent calendar! Stuff little treats or prizes inside for a sweet surprise each day leading up to Christmas.

Winter Wonderland Minis as an Advent Calendar

Winter Wonderland Minis as an Advent Calendar

Use the knitted pieces as Christmas tree ornaments or just tiny decorations to accent your home. Add them to the top of a wrapped present. Maybe your Elf on the Shelf needs a new hat each day? There are so many places to use these jolly little baubles!

Get the kit today!

This limited edition kit is available in two color options. Choose from Festive Christmas for a more traditional look or Tropical Holiday for a punched up pink!

Each Winter Wonderland Mini Garland Kit includes:

  • 4 skeins of Ewe Ewe Fluffy Fingering in one of two color combos

  • Winter Wonderland Mini Garland Pattern (code for Ravelry download)

  • 60" of twine

  • 6 1/2" pom poms

  • 6 mini clothespins

  • 6 mini jingle bells

Winter Wonderland Mini Garland Kit Price: $45

Hurry! Winter Wonderland Mini Garland Kits are only available through July 31st, 2019 from poststitch.com. Shop now to get yours!

Want just the pattern? Download Winter Wonderland Mini Garland on Ravelry.


New New @ Ewe Ewe: Neonpolitan!

New!  Neonpolitan  wrap knitting pattern using Fluffy Fingering yarn from Ewe Ewe

New! Neonpolitan wrap knitting pattern using Fluffy Fingering yarn from Ewe Ewe

Let’s start summer right with a good dose of sunshine! The new Neonpolitan shawl knitting pattern has just the right amount of sweet but isn’t vanilla in any way.

This simple shawl is lightweight and perfect for summer when knit with our skinny Fluffy Fingering merino yarn. Choose your three favorite colors, cast on and relax with this easy project.

Neonpolitan  shawl knitting pattern by Heather Walpole

Neonpolitan shawl knitting pattern by Heather Walpole


How much yarn do I need?

Size: 24 high x 70 inches long after blocking 

Yarn: Ewe Ewe Yarns, Fluffy Fingering, 200 yards, 
Color A: 1 skein (43 Citrus Pop)
Color B: 1 skein (97 Brushed Silver)
Color C: 1 skein (98 Charcoal)

How to find the pattern and yarn

Pattern: Neonpolitan — on Ewe Ewe Yarns.
Neonpolitan — on Ravelry.

Yarn: Ewe Ewe Yarns Fluffy Fingering Merino yarn.

Locate: Find the yarn here or find a local yarn shop that carries Ewe Ewe Yarns.

Enjoy knitting your new project using Ewe Ewe yarn!

Carbeth Cardigan KAL: How to pick up stitches for the button band

How to pick up stitches for a button band in knitting

How to pick up stitches for a button band in knitting

We are closing in on this beautiful sweater creation! Our next step is to knit the button bands and to do that we have to pick up the stitches that will create the bands.

Carbeth Cardigan almost done!

Carbeth Cardigan almost done!

Here's our sweater! I'm so excited if you can't tell. The picking up happens first on the right front which is the side that goes on the righthand side of your body. 

The pattern instructions give us a number to pick up but since a lot of us added length in the body of the sweater we'll need to add stitches to that number because we have a longer edge now. There are two formulas to keep in mind while picking up.

  1. Pick up approximately 3 stitches for every 4 rows of knitting. Knit stitches are wider than they are tall so this ratio balances that difference so we avoid puckering or stretching.
  2. Pick up a multiple of 4 + 3. This might sound odd but it makes sense. The button band row is like this: P3, (k2, p2) to end. That means we want to have a wide 3-stitch section at the neck-edge of the button band to give us a place to pick up the neck ribbing. My size said to pick up 59 stitches which is (4 x 14) + 3 = 59. I had added about 1.5" to my sweater so as a result I picked up 67 stitches here. (4 x 16) + 3 = 67. 

Now, I can hear you all saying, "Heather, this is a lot to remember and what if I don't the right number?!" Well, I'm here to tell you that it's easy and you will get the right number. Just start at the bottom edge and pick up three, skip one, pick up three, skip one... all the way up the edge. 

Picking up stitches on the edge of a sweater for button bands

Picking up stitches on the edge of a sweater for button bands

Here's that that looks like. I've exaggerated the gaps here a bit but this is what you're aiming for. It doesn't make holes because everything fills in.

Picking up stitches on the edge of a sweater for button bands

Picking up stitches on the edge of a sweater for button bands

Make sure to pick up in the same place on every row. That will create a nice uniform edge on the front of your sweater. If you don't like where a stitch happened, rip back and pick it up again! This goes quickly and it's one of the most visually important parts of the garment so be sure you're satisfied with it. 

Picking up stitches on the edge of a sweater for button bands

Picking up stitches on the edge of a sweater for button bands

When I picked up this edge I just went for it. I did the pick up 3 for every 4 and counted when I got to the top. I ended at 66 stitches which happened to only be 1 stitch away from a multiple-of-4+3. I ripped back about 10 stitches and eased that one extra stitch into place to end with 67. 

Picking up stitches on the edge of a sweater for button bands

Picking up stitches on the edge of a sweater for button bands

If you have ANY questions about this formula or how many stitches you might need to add for your sweater than PLEASE email me. We will figure it out!

Creating a finished button band on a knit sweater

Creating a finished button band on a knit sweater

After we're happy with that first pick up edge then we can work the ribbing rows. It's just 5 rows and it goes fast.

Creating a finished button band on a knit sweater

Creating a finished button band on a knit sweater

That's it! Now repeat for the left side of the sweater with the RS showing, begin at the neck edge and work your way to the hem. We leave all of these stitches on holders until after we complete the neck edge.

Check in, ask questions, keep knitting!

Check in online on Instagram with the hashtags #BaaBaaCarbeth and #EweEweKAL. Follow @eweeweyarns on Instagram now! Plus you can join my Ewe Ewe Yarns Ravelry group if you like that type of thing. Whichever!

Email me if you have any questions! (It's always me on the other side of that form.)


Carbeth Cardigan KAL: Decreasing the yoke of the sweater

Decreasing the yoke of the Carbeth Cardigan

Decreasing the yoke of the Carbeth Cardigan

The decreases on the yoke of the Carbeth Cardigan are what make this sweater shine. 

One good thing to keep in mind about this cardigan is that we're not decreasing the sleeve stitches. If you've ever worked a regular raglan sweater we normally increase or decrease evenly across the body and sleeves to create the lines toward the armholes. On this sweater we're only decreasing the front and back stitches and all those sleeve stitches stay in place. That's what creates that really cool effect. 

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We're going to be decreasing on EVERY row which is a little unusual and that's why the decrease lines are so pronounced. 

Decreases for the knit rows

As we knit around the row we'll work a decrease either before or after a marker. It's important to do the right decrease at the right place each time. Before the marker is a right-leaning decrease or K2tog. After the marker is a left-leaning decrease so we SSK.

Here's how to K2tog

K2tog: Knit 2 stitches together into 1. Single right-leaning decrease.


Here's how to SSK

SSK: Slip the next 2 stitches, one at a time as if to knit, to the right needle. Insert the left needle into the fronts of these two stitches and knit them together. Single left-leaning decrease.


Decreases for the purl rows

The same concepts apply for the wrong side or purl side of the work. We're working a left-leaning decrease (LLD) before a marker and a P2tog after the marker. Again, it's important to do the right decrease at the right place each time because that's what gives us those amazing lines up the shoulders.

How to work an LLD

LLD: Slip the next 2 stitches one at a time as if to knit, insert left needle as if to SSK, remove right needle, purl these 2 stitches together through the back loop. Single left-leaning decrease.


Here's how to P2tog

P2tog: Purl 2 stitches together into 1. Single right-leaning decrease.

Check out these decreases! It's happening! 

Decreases on the Carbeth Cardigan

Decreases on the Carbeth Cardigan


Check in, ask questions, keep knitting!

Check in online on Instagram with the hashtags #BaaBaaCarbeth and #EweEweKAL. Follow @eweeweyarns on Instagram now! Plus you can join my Ewe Ewe Yarns Ravelry group if you like that type of thing. Whichever!

Email me if you have any questions! (It's always me on the other side of that form.)


Carbeth Cardigan KAL: Joining the body and sleeves

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We’ve done a lot of knitting and now it’s time to put it all together! There are a lot of moving parts on this step but it’s really just one row that we have to work. We're about the join the sleeves to the body and create the yoke of the sweater.

Parts of the Carbeth Cardigan before assembly

Parts of the Carbeth Cardigan before assembly

Here we have our pieces! The body is knit up to the armholes and each sleeve is worked to the same place. There are stitches on holders waiting at the underarms but otherwise we're going to work all of these stitches into one piece. 

I like to have all of my stitches on needles for this type of work before I start the row. That way I don't have to stop midway through. Here I have my body on my longest gauge-size circular needle. Everything will be transferred to this needle so it's best to have the longest cord you have. My sleeve in the upper left is on a shorter cord with below-gauge needle tips and my sleeve in the upper right is on a set up DPNs. And have your 4 stitch markers ready, too!  

Knitting the Carbeth Cardigan together

Knitting the Carbeth Cardigan together

Let's get this crazy row started!

Join your yarn to the leading edge of your sweater. Start with a ball that still has a lot of yarn on it so you know you'll make it through this section. Work across the Right Front stitches and place a marker on the needle. The numbers on the pattern should have land right at the right armhole.

Joining a sleeve to the Carbeth Cardigan

Joining a sleeve to the Carbeth Cardigan

Then it's sleeve time! Using your working yarn begin knitting the stitches from the sleeve on to the body needle. The pattern calls for 42 sleeve stitches and that's what I had. Phew!

Joining a sleeve to the Carbeth Cardigan

Joining a sleeve to the Carbeth Cardigan

There it is! The first sleeve is attached. We place a second marker and knit across the back of the body. Smooth sailing.

Joining a sleeve to the Carbeth Cardigan

Joining a sleeve to the Carbeth Cardigan

The second sleeve should be just as easy but it's a little insane looking with the double-points.  Nobody but a knitter would understand what's going on here! Place a marker and move around your stitches.

Knitting the Carbeth Cardigan together

Knitting the Carbeth Cardigan together

OK! Look at that -- both sets of needles are on the table and I'm placing my last marker. Just the left front left to knit.

Knitting the Carbeth Cardigan together

Knitting the Carbeth Cardigan together

And, done! Looking from the top this is a long and wild row but we have everything on there and all the parts aligned. 

Beginning the yoke of a Carbeth Cardigan

Beginning the yoke of a Carbeth Cardigan

There it is! It's looking like a sweater! The body has sleeves and the sleeves are in the right place. That's all we can ask for in this world, isn't it? :) 

Our next step is to knit 5 more rows even. As you work these stockinette stitch rows the sections at the sleeve might feel a little tight moving around the needle but it gets smoother at every row. Just shift the stitches around the cord to make it more comfortable. 

Carbeth Cardigan  by Kate Davies

Carbeth Cardigan by Kate Davies

Then we get to the part that makes the Carbeth Cardigan so unique -- the decreases! We're going to create those stunning lines up the yoke with only stitches, no seams. Every row of the yoke gets smaller by 4 stitches so I think it will go fast. 

Check in, ask questions, keep knitting!

Check in online on Instagram with the hashtags #BaaBaaCarbeth and #EweEweKAL. Follow @eweeweyarns on Instagram now! Plus you can join my Ewe Ewe Yarns Ravelry group if you like that type of thing. Whichever!

Email me if you have any questions! (It's always me on the other side of that form.)