Chilly Headband + Mitts Cable Knitting Pattern

Chilly Headband + Mitts  in Wooly Worsted yarn by Ewe Ewe

Chilly Headband + Mitts in Wooly Worsted yarn by Ewe Ewe

Oh, I love a good new project. The Chilly Headband + Mitts are here and they’re fabulous! Look at those amazing matching cables.

Chilly Headband + Mitts  designed by Makenzie Alvarez for Ewe Ewe Yarns

Chilly Headband + Mitts designed by Makenzie Alvarez for Ewe Ewe Yarns

Makenzie Alvarez of Hanks and Needles designed this beautiful set using Ewe Ewe Wooly Worsted merino yarn. Makenzie is known for her cable knitting patterns and she brings those skills on this headband and wrist warmer set!

I checked in with Makenzie for a little Q&A and to dig a little deeper about her passion for making cable knit projects.

Designer Interview with Makenzie Alvarez of Hanks and Needles

Heather: How did you fall in love with cable knitting?

Makenzie: For me it was love at first cable! The added element of creating the cable and watching the elegant dance of stitches crossing knitwear in a beautiful yarn brings them to life; a process I am always inspired by and will never tire of.

Chilly Mitts  designed by Makenzie Alvarez

Chilly Mitts designed by Makenzie Alvarez

Heather: We can get such an amazing texture by moving the stitches around with a cable needle. Why did you choose Ewe Ewe Wooly Worsted yarn for the Chilly Headband + Mitts project?

Makenzie: When it comes to designing I am always hunting for yarns that have good stitch definition and that will enhance the cable work. The beautiful twist and color palette of the Ewe Ewe yarn lines has the best of both and it is a delight to knit with!

Heather: I agree! I love the way stitches pop in Wooly Worsted. I think it’s unbeatable (but then again, it is my yarn so I might be biased.)

Chilly Headband cable knitting pattern designed by Makenzie Alvarez of Hanks and Needles

Chilly Headband cable knitting pattern designed by Makenzie Alvarez of Hanks and Needles

Heather: What’s coming next at Hanks and Needles?

Makenzie: Many new things are happening this year. I am jumping in to garment design and adding a lot more accessory patterns including one that many fans have been requesting; my Viking Gloves in Ewe So Sporty yarn from Ewe Ewe.

Heather: I can’t wait to see those new gloves! We’ll have to get together and chat again about your inspiration for that pattern when it launches. Thanks for taking few minutes to chat with me today!

Keep up with Makenzie on her website hanksandneedles.com, on her very active Instagram, and on Ravelry.


About the Chilly Headband + Mitts

Throw your hair up and slip on this soft merino cable headband. Keep your hands warm while your fingers are free with a matching pair of cozy mitts. The headband and mitts feature a bold, fun cable that really stand out when knit with Ewe Ewe Wooly Worsted merino yarn.

Where do I get the Chilly Headband + Mitts knitting pattern?

Instructions for both the headband and mitts are included on the same pattern. You can download it at the locations below.

On eweewe.com: Chilly Headband + Mitts PDF Knitting Pattern

On Ravelry: Chilly Headband + Mitts Knitting Pattern

How much yarn do I need for the Chilly Headband?

Headband: Size: 4.5" (11.5 cm) wide x 20" length (51 cm)
Yarn: Ewe Ewe Yarns Wooly Worsted, 95 yards, 1 skein, Wheat or color of your choice

How much yarn do I need for the Chilly Mitts?

Mitts: Sizes: Small (Large): 7.25 (7.75)" / 18.5 (19.5) cm circumference and 20" / 51 cm length
Yarn: Ewe Ewe Yarns Wooly Worsted, 95 yards, 2 skeins, Wheat or color of your choice

Where do I find Wooly Worsted yarn?

Right here on this website: Wooly Worsted merino yarn.

Find a Ewe Ewe Yarn Store near you: View stockists.

What color Wooly Worsted yarn should I choose?

Your favorite one! The Chilly Headband + Mitts sample was knit using Wooly Worsted in Wheat but the simple beauty of this design means any color will work perfectly. Choose one to match your coat or pick a bright one to stand out!

See all the yarn colors: Ewe Ewe Wooly Worsted merino yarn and choose the one you love.

Wooly Worsted Merino Yarn
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Supply List: Tenergy LED Lamp for Knitting and Reading

Tenergy LED Crafting Lamp

Tenergy LED Crafting Lamp

Hello! Heather here with a little notions aside. I know we all have our gadgets we love and I wanted to drop in and tell you about my latest discovery – better lighting! Working on a knitting project without enough light can be a real problem. If I can't see well enough I might miss a stitch or worse yet drop a stitch.

Enter my new best friend the Tenergy LED Lamp. Look at these well-lit stitches!

Bright stitches! Better lighting makes for better knitting.

Bright stitches! Better lighting makes for better knitting.

Ahh, simply magical! 

Now, I need to be upfront here and let you know that Tenergy contacted me and asked if I'd like to try this new LED lamp because they thought it would be great for me and my fellow knitters. I don't normally do product reviews unless it's something I have tested and l would really think people would benefit from knowing more about and therefore I normally turn down offers like the one I received from Tenergy. BUT! After reading the email I realized that I already have this lamp's little sister on my desk! I use it every day and I love it.

Tenergy LED Crafting Lamp

Tenergy LED Crafting Lamp

The Tenergy lamps are awesome because they have all LED panels that give the light. That means it's not a big awkward fluorescent light and it's also not hot like a traditional incandescent bulb. The light panel can give a ton of coverage without the downsides.

LEDs come in a wide range of brightness and color ranges and the nice thing about these Tenergy lights is that they have a control panel that allows you adjust the brightness. That means you can use it on a really bright setting if you're working on a project during the daytime and need a bit more light or if you're working on a dark colored yarn like something with a lot of black or brown in it. You can also adjust to something a bit lower light if you're knitting in the evening or watching a movie with your honey and still want to knit but not light up the whole room. Pretty great.

The Tenergy lamps can also adjust to give you a color temperature based on what your needs are. Now, I know you're like... What's color temperature?! Yeah, that's when light ranges from something bluey-white (cool) to something a bit more orange/yellow (warm).  Look here:

Pretty neat, isn't it? I use the cooler light when I really need to see my stitches and concentrate and I use a warmer setting when I just want to relax and knit. Generally speaking cooler light provides a brighter white for more clarity and a warmer light is there when you're ready to de-stress and put your feet up. All of these settings can be fine-tuned to your liking right on the touch panel.

But wait -- there's more! The Tenergy Floor Lamp that I'm using in the photos is actually a 2-in-1 design. It can be converted from a floor lamp to a desk lamp in just a couple of minutes! 

Tenergy LED 2-in-1 Floor Lamp/Desk Lamp

Tenergy LED 2-in-1 Floor Lamp/Desk Lamp

Yes! I love that! Use the full-size lamp in the living room while you're knitting and then shorten it up to use on your craft table for quilting the next day. Genius! I'll be honest here and say that I used mine on the dining table to work a jigsaw puzzle a few weeks ago. The chandelier wasn't giving me enough detail so I adjusted this one and we taught that puzzle who was boss.

I really do like this new Tenergy LED Lamp and am happy that I can share it with you because I think you'd like it, too. It makes me wonder if I would have bought that original desk lamp I have if this brilliant design had been available then? I might have just bought this version since it is double duty but definitely love that I have two now. 

If you need a new crafting light I am happy to recommend the Tenergy LED Floor Lamp Desk Lamp. Find it on Amazon.


Amazon Affiliate links are used in this post and we may get a small share of the sale.

Double the Fun KAL: The Shift is moving along

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Hello from Ewe Ewe land! How is your cowl coming? I am in love with mine. I don't know what it is about this Teal and Pistachio combo that has me swooning but I can't believe I haven't done it before!

This was a fun section but not too different from Day 1. We're going line by line increasing each RS row. We started in the back at the seam edge that will eventually be at the back of the neck. The beautiful edge at the top is the neckline and I just rounded the corner and started working the bottom edge that will mimic the neckline. I can't wait to see where we go from here!

More projects!

I love to see your projects as they're growing. Instagram is an easy way to post them but if you don't use it then go ahead and send me an email at heather@eweewe.com!


Check in, encourage others, have fun!

Heather and Meaghan are here to answer any questions you might have about these projects and how a knit-along works. We hope you'll join us on this summertime knitting adventure!

We'll check in online on Instagram with the hashtags #DoubleTheFunKAL and #EweEweKALFollow @eweeweyarns and @notsorryknitter on Instagram now! 

Email us if you have any questions! (We're just a click away.)


Carbeth Cardigan KAL: Blocking your sweater

We so close to being able to WEAR OUR SWEATERS! Isn't it amazing? Can you imagine yourself in it? Do you have a first outfit picked out for it? 

My answer is yes to all of these questions!

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Blocking a sweater is easier than it seems. I think blocking a shawl is more challenging since they often want you to use a ton of pins and blocking wires to create a specific shape. In the case of the Carbeth Cardigan we're just going to get it fully saturated, lay it out correctly and then let it dry. Letting it dry completely is the hardest part because I just want to get in there and put it on.

How to block a hand-knit sweater

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Supplies:

  1. A bucket large enough to hold enough water to fully submerge your sweater.
  2. Wool wash such as Soak
  3. 3-4 large towels. I use what I call "dog towels" which are the old spare towels we all keep around for the day the dishwasher leaks. However, even if you don't have old towels you can safely use your normal towels with Ewe Ewe yarns. Our yarns are 100% washable and the colors don't run so there's no fear of color bleed.
  4. Blocking mats or trash bags. Weird combo, I know but you'll see!
  5. Straight pins if desired. I didn't end up using them but you may want to.
  6. An empty area your dog won't be.
carbeth_cardigan_blocking_b.jpg

To prepare your sweater for blocking you should have all the buttons attached and the ends woven in. A trick I learned from The Unapologetic Knitter is to weave in the yarn ends but not trim the tails until after the project is finished drying. Trimming the ends after blocking allows the yarn ends to get comfortable in their new home and you can trim them off on the inside of the sweater after it's dried. This helps prevent any strange poking ends!

Set your sweater in the bucket and add a bit of wool wash. Fill the bucket with water to cover the sweater. Your sweater may float but you can gently continue to submerge it until it stops bubbling. Leave it to rest in the water for about 15-20 minutes.

What's wool wash? I use Soak which is a rinse-free laundry soap that smells great. You can just block your sweater with water but adding a wool wash helps soften the fibers even more. 

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When the timer's done gently drain the water from the bucket being as gentle to your sweater as possible. Do not wring out or lift your sweater. Hold the sweater to the edge of the bucket and pour out the contents. 

Lay down 2 towels on a hard flat surface and roll the sweater out onto them. Your sweater will be very wet and it's going to feel a bit like you're wrestling an octopus. Position it on the towels so it looks pretty reasonable.

carbeth_cardigan_blocking_d.jpg

Add a third towel and begin to roll the sweater in the towels pressing firmly and rolling tightly. This method will gently wick the water out of the sweater without misshaping it.

carbeth_cardigan_blocking_e.jpg

Now, the final step! Setting your sweater to dry. If you have blocking mats this is the time to use them. I don't own any, I'm not sure why I don't, I just haven't bought them yet. However! I did learn a good tip from an Drea Renee Knits pattern -- if you don't have blocking mats use trash bags instead. It doesn't sound very glamorous but I'm giving it a try. The idea is that by pinning out your project on plastic the water will be forced to evaporate upward and into the air. If you just set it on a towel on carpet the moisture could linger down below. By adding the bags we're hoping for a faster drying time!

Arrange your sweater with the buttons buttoned and the bands set in place. Arrange the collar so it's straight. Lay the decrease lines so the are perfect angles from the neck to the underarm. There is no need to stretch or warp anything here, just gently work your way around the sweater smoothing it to wear it needs to be. 

It may seem a bit droopy but that is because of all the water the yarn is holding. Baa Baa Bulky yarn, and all Ewe Ewe yarns, really bounces back after it's been blocked. The gaps and strange sections will gradually fill in and come to life as the sweater dries. Now we wait...

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It's important to let your sweater DRY. Completely dry. It's hard to do but give it time because the result is worth it.


How was it? Did you finish?

How did you do on your Carbeth Cardigan? Did you have fun? Did you finish your sweater? Send me a picture! 

Check in online on Instagram with the hashtags #BaaBaaCarbeth and #EweEweKAL. Follow @eweeweyarns on Instagram now! Plus you can join my Ewe Ewe Yarns Ravelry group if you like that type of thing. Whichever!

Email me if you have any questions! (It's always me on the other side of that form.)


The Shift or A Shirt? Choose our next KAL!

Our Carbeth Cardigan KAL has been a ton of fun. Let's make a lighter project in July using Ewe So Sporty yarn from Ewe Ewe. Which one should we choose? 

The Shift cowl by Andrea Mowry.  View on Ravelry >

The Shift cowl by Andrea Mowry. View on Ravelry >

Guildenstern by Cory Ellen Boberg.  View on Ravelry >

Guildenstern by Cory Ellen Boberg. View on Ravelry >

We can make The Shift cowl by Andrea Mowry of Drea Renee Knits or we could go for a cute summer top with Guildenstern by Cory Ellen Boberg of indie.knits. 


Ready to choose our next KAL?

The Shift or A Shirt? *
We're ready to choose the project for our next knit-along. Take this quick survey to help us pick!

Carbeth Cardigan KAL: Knitting the ribbed collar

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We're ready to knit the neckline and fold it down to create the tidy stand-up collar for the Carbeth Cardigan. We're going to make a knitted hem using a 3-needle bind off.

Carbeth Cardigan  by Kate Davies on Ravelry

Carbeth Cardigan by Kate Davies on Ravelry

Here we are with the finished neck rib. There should be 33 rows of ribbing total. The designer had a discrepancy in the original pattern so be sure you have the updated instructions that repeat rows 1 and 2 15 times. This is what it should look like…

Neck rib on the Carbeth Cardigan using Baa Baa Bulky yarn from Ewe Ewe.

Neck rib on the Carbeth Cardigan using Baa Baa Bulky yarn from Ewe Ewe.

The ribbing will be folded in half and joined to the inside of the sweater by picking up stitches and then working a 3-needle bind off. To do this we're going to pick up stitches on the row before the ribbing starts. We need a second circular needle and we'll be looking at the inside or wrong side of the sweater. 

Locate the row at the bottom of the ribbing. It's easily identified by the purl bumps at the end of the ribbing.

Locating where to pick up stitches

Locating where to pick up stitches

With our second circular needle and starting at the left front edge, pick up 4 stitches over the button band and then proceed along the row just below the ribbing. We are pick up stitches from the right to the left.

Picking up stitches at the neckline.

Picking up stitches at the neckline.

Keep in mind we're not doing "pick up and knit" here. We're just doing "pick up" meaning sliding these loops on a needle. No extra yarn required here.

Picking up stitches at the neckline of a Carbeth Cardigan.

Picking up stitches at the neckline of a Carbeth Cardigan.

As we move along the stitches are getting captured on this needle to just kind of hold on to them for the next step. Be sure to pick up 78 stitches on this new needle. There will be 4 from each button band plus the 70 collar stitches.

Picking up stitches at the neckline of a Carbeth Cardigan

Picking up stitches at the neckline of a Carbeth Cardigan

Working a 3-needle bind off

A 3-needle bind off is easier than it sounds and it makes closing this hem simple because we have matching stitch counts on each needle.

To perform a 3-needle bind off: Align the two working needles in a parallel manner. Insert a third needle as if to knit on the working needles. Knit these two stitches together. Knit a second stitch in the same way and lift the first stitch over and off the third needle. 

As you work along your 78 stitches you'll see the stitches combining to create a hem!

Finished! Hemmed collar from the back of the sweater. Looks like a smile! 

Finished! Hemmed collar from the back of the sweater. Looks like a smile! 

When you're done you should have a nice tidy edge like this!

Finished! Hemmed collar.

Finished! Hemmed collar.

Check in, ask questions, keep knitting!

Check in online on Instagram with the hashtags #BaaBaaCarbeth and #EweEweKAL. Follow @eweeweyarns on Instagram now! Plus you can join my Ewe Ewe Yarns Ravelry group if you like that type of thing. Whichever!

Email me if you have any questions! (It's always me on the other side of that form.)